Author Topic: nearby as an adjective, as a compound preposition, and as an adverb  (Read 4805 times)

Offline nima_persia

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 I live in a nearby town.
 I live in a town nearby.
 I live in a near by town.

 Would an educated one please show me in readily way, what is the difference between those semantically?- I am an English learner.

 Any comment or feed-back would greatly be appreciated

 Nima,
 Cheers

Offline Daniel

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Re: nearby as an adjective, as a compound preposition, and as an adverb
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2015, 12:47:58 AM »
I live in a nearby town:
--I live somewhere
--That place is near

 I live in a town nearby.
--I live in a town
--I do that nearby

 I live in a near by town.
(awkward but I guess grammatical)
--I live near here
--I live not inside, but close to the town (some important town, maybe where we are now, or the big one that is close, etc.)

In the end, the firs two have essentially the same semantics. But the emphasis is a little different. In the first the focus is on the town. In the second, it's on the location that the living (in the town) happens.

The third is a little awkward and means something else.


EDIT: The third sentence is ungrammatical. I misread it when first writing this. "in a near by town" is just not something that we would say in English. That's either mixing two ideas, or just writing a space where there should not be one ("nearby").
« Last Edit: April 02, 2015, 09:03:17 AM by djr33 »
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Offline freknu

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Re: nearby as an adjective, as a compound preposition, and as an adverb
« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2015, 01:34:59 AM »
Or in cliffnotes:

1. [I live] [in a [nearby town]]
2. [I live] [in a town] [nearby] → [I live [nearby]] [in a town]

That third one sounds really akward to me? Is it really grammatical with an "in" inbetween there?

3. (?) [I live] [in a] (near by) [town].

I get the feeling "by" conflicts with "in", and that "near by" requires an object:

4a. I live near by a town → near and outside a town
4b. I live near in a town → near and inside a town
4c. I live nearby in a town → (same as 4b)
4d. I live in a near by town → (doesn't make sense)
4e. I live nearby → (does not require an object)
4f. I live near by → (requires an object)

"In a town" and "near by a town" are in conflict :/

Or am I missing something?

Offline Daniel

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Re: nearby as an adjective, as a compound preposition, and as an adverb
« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2015, 09:03:47 AM »
You're right! I misread it, correcting in my head. My post above is edited.
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Offline nima_persia

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Re: nearby as an adjective, as a compound preposition, and as an adverb
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2015, 11:54:27 AM »

 Great , many thanks all. I got it.