Author Topic: Changing words in a quotation  (Read 1660 times)

Offline Daniel

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Re: Changing words in a quotation
« Reply #45 on: January 06, 2017, 03:31:41 PM »
If you're quoting, use the original spelling-- either in a direct quotation, or if you say "S/he calls it '____'" [in quotes!]. But if you are using the term yourself or describing the meaning of the term, then you should integrate it into your paper (however you wish).

You have to decide what you want to do and what works in each situation.

If you want a simple rule, use your own spelling whenever you use the term, except in direct quotations.
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Offline Natalia

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Re: Changing words in a quotation
« Reply #46 on: January 06, 2017, 03:44:34 PM »
Well, I am talking about using a term that is taken from an author's book and then discussed.

If I write something like this "Author X's (2005: 34) theory called Generalized Theory assumes that...", I should keep the original spelling, right?
Then, if mention the name of the theory a second time, I should keep the original spelling or change it?

I am sorry, but I am not sure if I understand your point.

Offline Daniel

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Re: Changing words in a quotation
« Reply #47 on: January 06, 2017, 03:52:29 PM »
You can just change it always.

All I was saying for using the original spelling is that if for example you include a list of different terms in the introduction to your paper, you might list all of the terms including the original spelling. But if you're using the terms yourself, then you should probably change them, including in the first instance [any time except direct quotations].
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Offline Natalia

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Re: Changing words in a quotation
« Reply #48 on: January 06, 2017, 04:02:15 PM »
But, would it be incorrect to write "Author X's (2005: 34) theory called Generalised Theory assumes that..."? (given that the original spelling was American)

Offline Daniel

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Re: Changing words in a quotation
« Reply #49 on: January 06, 2017, 04:03:04 PM »
Yes, because you are talking about the meaning.
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Offline Natalia

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Re: Changing words in a quotation
« Reply #50 on: January 06, 2017, 04:07:01 PM »
So if someone calls their theories, hypotheses, etc. in a particular way, maybe I shouldn't change the name at all and stick to the original meaning?

Offline Daniel

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Re: Changing words in a quotation
« Reply #51 on: January 06, 2017, 04:07:30 PM »
Here are some examples, with the intention clarified:

Use your orthography when you will be adopting the term:
Quote
In 1950, AuthorX introduced Generalised Theory, which was very popular and is still used today; therefore, I will apply Generalised Theory to my research in this paper also.

You can choose whether you want to use the original spelling when you are only mentioning the term
Quote
In 1950, AuthorX introduced what s/he called Generalized Theory, but because my approach differs slightly I will be using a different theory called Theory 2.
Or
Quote
In 1950, AuthorX introduced what s/he called Generalised Theory, but because my approach differs slightly I will be using a different theory called Theory 2.

Changing the spelling shouldn't ever be wrong (unless it is a direct quote), so you can do that all the time if you want. I was just saying that you could also use the original spelling if you are only referring to the theory but not using it yourself, like in the second example.
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Offline Natalia

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Re: Changing words in a quotation
« Reply #52 on: January 06, 2017, 04:18:08 PM »
But If I refer to the theory (says that an author calls it that way or another) and then discuss it? Would it be more correct to stick to the original spelling or change it (which as we both agree looks a bit strange)?

Which of the two options would be right?

"Author X's (2005: 34) theory called Generalized Theory assumes that....
Supporters of Generalized/Generalised Theory..."


Incidentally, I cannot understand why I might not say

1. Author X's (2005: 34) theory called Generalised Theory assumes that...

but I can say:

2. In 1950, Author X introduced Generalised Theory which...

In either case, I use the term as an author called it, without using direct quotations.

« Last Edit: January 06, 2017, 04:48:37 PM by Natalia »

Offline Daniel

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Re: Changing words in a quotation
« Reply #53 on: January 06, 2017, 04:51:50 PM »
It's not a rule, or about being "correct". You can do it either way, based on what feels best to you.

To answer your question, but not to add to the confusion:
Quote
But If I refer to the theory (says that an author calls it that way or another) and then discuss it? Would it be more correct to stick to the original spelling or change it (which as we both agree looks a bit strange)?
...

Incidentally, I cannot understand why I might not say
...
In either case, I use the term as an author called it, without using direct quotations.
The difference is that in the first case I was talking about only mentioning the theory, and in the second you are introducing and adopting the theory. Those are very different purposes: the first is more like quoting, and the second is more like naming your own theory.


Anyway, it's absolutely fine if you use your own spelling for all usage and just do that.
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Offline Natalia

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Re: Changing words in a quotation
« Reply #54 on: January 06, 2017, 05:07:32 PM »
Perhaps there might be some kind of misunderstaning.

In fact, I am not talking about introducing and adopting the theory, but rather introducing and discussing the theory, as you do it in your theoretical part.

In the above example

Author X's (2005: 34) theory called Generalized/Generalised Theory assumes that no syntactic rule can refer to a morphologival category or feature.Supporters of Generalized/Generalised Theory....

I introduce the theory and then write what it is about. Then I mention it a second time and also discuss some point. The original spelling is 'Generalized Theory'.

Could you please tell me which of the two options I should use in the example above?
« Last Edit: January 06, 2017, 05:09:57 PM by Natalia »

Offline Daniel

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Re: Changing words in a quotation
« Reply #55 on: January 06, 2017, 05:18:58 PM »
If you maintain a distance from the theory (by discussing it as a history lesson, essentially), then I don't see a problem with also maintaining a distance by using the original spelling. It's not about whether it's used once or more times, but about whether you are using as part of your paper, as opposed to just describing what other people did.

But anyway, either one is fine here, and this is such a small problem that I have trouble even having an opinion about it. As I said, you can just always change the spelling, and that will not be a problem. If you WANT to use the original spelling, then I would suggest doing that only when you are taking a removed stance from the theory because you are not adopting it in your paper.

That's really all the advice I can give on this topic.
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Offline Natalia

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Re: Changing words in a quotation
« Reply #56 on: January 07, 2017, 02:30:45 AM »
Thank you. I will try to cope with that somehow.

What about examples that I take from books (or that I will be collecting from different journals)? I should stick to the original spelling?

For example, here is a passage:
"Bauer (2006: 45) cites examples such as 'realization', 'generalization', etc."

I should cite the examples with their original (American) spelling?

Offline Daniel

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Re: Changing words in a quotation
« Reply #57 on: January 07, 2017, 12:02:00 PM »
If you are dealing with real data, never change it. That includes data from a corpus, from fieldwork, cited from another publication, and so forth.

But if you're dealing with EXAMPLE data, with hypothetical sentences, then I suppose you could change it. But if you're citing it from another source, I would think this is most often like a direct quotation, so you should probably use the original spelling.

In other words, if you could make up the data yourself, then you could change the spelling. If it's just "this is a generic grammatical sentence in English" then you could. But you don't have to. And maybe you shouldn't, since you're referring to another author's example. If the example is special/unique in any way, then you shouldn't.

The same question applies to historical data. If you find a sentence from Shakespeare, you would keep the same spelling, even though it might not be modern. (Sometimes for really old data, like Old English, you could use a gloss to clarify it, or include in brackets some updated spellings. But you wouldn't replace them without indicating that.) For other languages, sometimes without a standard orthography, sometimes authors will update the spelling to reflect a new standard or to keep something consistent with their own work. But in that case they are usually experts in that language and have good specific reasons for doing this (consistency and clarity, when there are VERY different spelling systems, not just a few letters different).

Short answer: no, don't change it.
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Offline Natalia

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Re: Changing words in a quotation
« Reply #58 on: January 08, 2017, 02:24:16 AM »
That is what I thought, but I wanted to make sure. Thank you.