Author Topic: Cognate object constructions and hyponyms of structured-sounds  (Read 7185 times)

Offline Etbouri

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Dear all,

I recently came across with the label "hyponyms of structured-sounds" (couldn't find where but I think it was in a book written by Levin and Atkins) and I was wondering if these could be considered a type of cognate object. Some examples could be the following:

1886   Referee 18 Aug. (Ware),   Mr. Wilford Morgan has been engaged to chortle the famous song, ‘Here's to the maiden of bashful fifteen’

1889   Referee 29 Dec.,   Many present on Boxing Night fully expected that when he appeared he would chortle a chansonette or two.

1785   W. Cowper Task iv. 148   No stationary steeds Cough their own knell.

c1480   Ragman Roll 183 in W. C. Hazlitt Remains Early Pop. Poetry Eng.(1864) I. 77   Aftir that ye coghyn up a songe.

1718   N. Rowe tr. Lucan Pharsalia i. 394   Scorning the wound he [sc. the lion] yawns a dreadful roar.

1828   Macaulay Polit. Georgics in Poems 30   Let all in bulky majesty appear, Roll the dull eye, and yawn th'unmeaning cheer.

1707   in H. Playford Wit & Mirth (new ed.) IV. 121   The tender flocks their pasture mourn, and bleat a sadder moan.

c1440   Morte Arth. 1351   He berkes myche boste.

1881   C. M. YONGE Lads & Lasses Langley i. 41   Some used to bellow or screech out any familiar hymn in an irreverent way.

1837   T. CARLYLE French Revol. II. VI. vi. 399   Saint-Antoine booming out eloquent tocsin, of its own accord.

Offline lx

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Re: Cognate object constructions and hyponyms of structured-sounds
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2014, 10:23:04 AM »
I hate to be pedantic, but I am not sure what you're asking. I don't see a question in your post. In the last line of your post before you give the examples, are you telling us this or is that a formulation that you're asking us about? What is the connection to sounds? It's really unclear what you're asking us.

Offline Daniel

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Re: Cognate object constructions and hyponyms of structured-sounds
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2014, 10:49:03 AM »
Cognates, defined literally, are from the same etymological root, so I don't see how these would count in that sense. But they may represent another very similar phenomenon in the domain of verbal complementation.
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Offline freknu

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Re: Cognate object constructions and hyponyms of structured-sounds
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2014, 12:25:59 PM »
I think the word you're looking for is "parallellism".

Offline Etbouri

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Re: Cognate object constructions and hyponyms of structured-sounds
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2014, 12:45:07 PM »
Thank you all for your replies. Sorry about being so unclear.

The question I implicitly asked is the following: Can we consider hyponyms structured-sounds as instances of Cognate Object Constructions? I know that cognate objects have been understood in the literature as objects that are morphologically and etymologically related to the verb they occur with BUT... aren't other instances such as sing "a kind of a song" related to cognate object constructions, at least semantically?

Offline freknu

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Re: Cognate object constructions and hyponyms of structured-sounds
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2014, 12:49:56 PM »
Oh, I see, a cognate object is where the object of a verb is a cognate to the verb.

(1) "He sang a song."

And no, in that case it would not be a cognate object to use:

(2) "He sang a ditty."

If the verb and object are not cognates, it is not a cognate object construct. Then it would be more accurate to use parallellism, repetition, or metaphor.

Offline Etbouri

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Re: Cognate object constructions and hyponyms of structured-sounds
« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2014, 01:03:01 PM »
Thank you freknu.

I am trying to trace the origin of constructions used to express speech acts involving verbs which are not specifically verbs of saying (say, talk, speak, tell...), as for example in the following reported speech construction with the verb chortle:
1871   ‘L. Carroll’ Through Looking-glass i. 24   ‘O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!’ He chortled in his joy.

The thing is that I am not sure if I should take into account these parallellisms or repetitions, as you call them, when exploring this issue. Do you guys have any idea?

Thank you very much,

Offline freknu

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Re: Cognate object constructions and hyponyms of structured-sounds
« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2014, 01:08:04 PM »
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/chortle

It's just metaphoric language, and especially Carroll used a lot of made-up words. General verbs of saying are quite non-descript, so using something like "yawned a roar" provides additional colour to the language.

Offline Daniel

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Re: Cognate object constructions and hyponyms of structured-sounds
« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2014, 02:54:16 PM »
Terminologically: I say not the same thing.
Phenomenonogically: I say they're related.

So whether or not the term applied I'd merely a matter of definition (and how transparent the use should be). But in terms of content, you can certainly discuss a relationship.


(Edit: autocorrect on phone making weird typos.)
« Last Edit: May 17, 2014, 05:22:46 PM by djr33 »
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Offline Etbouri

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Re: Cognate object constructions and hyponyms of structured-sounds
« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2014, 03:01:28 PM »
Thank you, Daniel.

So, do you think that in tracing the origins of the use of verbs of sound (chortle, yell, roar, bark...) as verbs of saying I should consider cognate object constructions and other "parallel" constructions with hyponyms?

Offline Daniel

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Re: Cognate object constructions and hyponyms of structured-sounds
« Reply #10 on: May 17, 2014, 05:24:13 PM »
Sure. It all seems related. I'm not sure how much time should be spent on each aspect (probably depends on amount of data and strength of associated arguments) but I would at least mention all of that.
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