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91
Language-specific analysis / Re: What do you think conservative language?
« Last post by panini on April 21, 2018, 02:55:53 PM »
I guess you're asking, why do some languages seem to change less or more slowly, compared to others. The standard story is that there must be some unknown sociological factors, but I think that's a bit facile. It is certainly true that if you have two linguistically different populations smashing into each other, you are likely to have substantial changes in language resulting. E.g. Moroccan Arabic is much further from Classical Arabic because originally Moroccans spoke Berber; Saudi dialects of Arabic tend to be the most conservative, correlated with the fact that Arabic was originally spoken only there. I don't think, though, that this really explains why Norwegian is so different from Old Norse, and Icelandic isn't.

The one social fact that does seem to have a connection to language change is urbanization. Seoul Korean has changed more from Middle Korean, compared to other especially rural dialects, and in general, linguists have found that cities are leaders of language change. Perhaps this is because cities attract speakers from many dialect areas, and what emerges is a mashing together and sanding-down of dialect differences.


92
Typology and Descriptive Linguistics / Re: Formal & informal "you"
« Last post by giselberga on April 21, 2018, 11:49:26 AM »
I am korean native speaker

The Formal “you” and informal “you” in Korean are The Informal is 너/네/니 and the Formal is 저희
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Language-specific analysis / Re: What do you think conservative language?
« Last post by giselberga on April 21, 2018, 10:17:45 AM »
Conservative language in linguistics means to remain closer to an older form. This do not change language
For example, Mandarin, Cantonese, Icelandic, Spanish is conservative language
How do you think conservative language?
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Language-specific analysis / Re: What do you think conservative language?
« Last post by panini on April 21, 2018, 09:22:55 AM »
I don;t think there is any such thing as a conservative language, but perhaps if you explain what you mean by "conservative language", I might change my mind. I also don't know what you mean by "what do I think (of)": like, do I like Cantonese (I have no opinion), or why do I think Cantonese is a conservative language (I don't because I don't know what "conservative language" means). Perhaps if you explain what you're asking...
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Language-specific analysis / What do you think conservative language?
« Last post by giselberga on April 21, 2018, 04:08:10 AM »
What do you think conservative language?
Mandarin, Cantonese, Icelandic, Spanish is conservative language
How do you think conservative language?
96
Phonetics and Phonology / Egyptolinguistic Phonology Question
« Last post by jkausch on April 17, 2018, 08:52:24 PM »
Hi,

I am working on a project to try to reconstruct, or at least re-examine classical Egyptological transliteration, of Ancient Egyptian vowels. Vowels are very important to the Egyptian priesthood due to the spiritual purity they represent, so I imagine that, like with Panini's rules of Sandhi for Sanskrit, the priests of the House of Life would go to great lengths to ensure and maintain vowel harmony.

The only problem is that Egyptian, being an Afroasiatic language, is written as an Abjad when the hieroglyphs are used in their rebic form. This leads me to the following questions:

- Does anyone have good literature on understanding triconsonantal roots not just in Semitic languages, but for all Afroasiatic languages in general? In particular, it would be good to have reference to the phonological system which underlies the roots diachronically.

- Are there graphotactical rules for how abjads betray their underlying phonology? Daniels' original definition seems to hint so

- Does anyone know about phonological work on Egyptian that has taken contemporary Greek language sources, such as Manetho, into account?

- Are there any other good, general reconstructions of Ancient Egyptian from the daughter language of Coptic which might be useful?

If any of you could help answer any or all of these questions, that would be most appreciated.
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Morphosyntax / Re: ambiguous ?
« Last post by binumal on April 12, 2018, 11:50:36 AM »
corrected the over negation,thank you for the reply
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Morphosyntax / Re: ambiguous ?
« Last post by Daniel on April 12, 2018, 07:11:38 AM »
There are two readings similar to what you described, but you've over-negated in your paraphrases:
1. This is the first year they didn't celebrate New Years.
2. The first New Years wasn't celebrated by them.

I'm not sure that the ambiguity is really about scope of the negation at all. Instead, it may just be about where the "for the first time" adverbial attaches structurally (within the verb phrase or to the clause as a whole). There might be additional readings possible if we also include scope of the negation, although they might be logically equivalent to those two readings generated by the adverbial attachment.

Note: for my ears, it must be "New Years" (e.g., a holiday, for some reason written in a plural or perhaps possessive form), unless you use it as a normal noun phrase with a determiner: "the new year".

My default interpretation would be low attachment, meaning "the first new year", or reading (2). But that is pragmatically bizarre (which is the "first" new year??), so unless the context permitted that, I would probably reinterpret it to fit as this being the first time they didn't, meaning they always have before. In other words, this is a very flexible ambiguity that is interpreted in context, without a strong bias one way or the other. It's a confusing example and could be clarified with a more controlled situation (rather than something that happens so rarely and repeatedly without a beginning).
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Language-specific analysis / Re: Please look at the following sentence
« Last post by Daniel on April 12, 2018, 07:03:40 AM »
No problem with that. In fact it is a common rhetorical device. "Even though that may be correct, I still don't like it." etc. It's like the archaic "Notwithstanding", where you are actually asserting something despite the possibility modal. Or it can be literal possibility. Depends on context. In the case of the quoted sentence above I read it literally, as possibility, not conclusion.
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Language-specific analysis / Re: Please look at the following sentence
« Last post by binumal on April 12, 2018, 03:14:41 AM »
Thank you , Now I found out the problem with me. Checking the corpus of my own write-ups , I observe that I have never used 'even though' with 'may be' , This I presume was because my  subconscious  mind has some how formed a rule that 'even though ' is incompatible with 'may be' .   ( may be due to the influence of my first language) .
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