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Hi Everybody (please help),

I’m having trouble deciphering how to diagram a sentence with the adjunctive prepositional phrase at the front of the sentence. As from ‘The boy found the cat in the garden’ to ‘In the garden, the boy found the cat’ and other similar sentences.

Thus, how do I show this ‘movement’ using X-Bar? :)

Any and all comments will be greatly appreciated.
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Morphosyntax / Quantifier scope
« Last post by binumal on May 25, 2018, 12:06:58 PM »
Consider the following sentence
1. Everyone in MIT knows two languages-
Clearly , the sentence has two readings, a wide scope reading for 'two languages' and a narrow scope reading for the same QP.
In my mother tongue, the narrow scope reading is absent in constructions like this. I shall give an example below.
2. M.I.T yil             ellavarkkum rantu  bhaasha     ariyaam.
   M.IT.  Loc.            every/all     two   languages    Know.Modal.--------------------------------The sentence could only mean that every one in MIT knows only 2 particular languages ( say,English and Sanskrit ) .The sentence cannot mean they know any two language.
My question is whether  there are any other language in which the narrow scope reading is absent.
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Language-specific analysis / Re: About "Languages" (forum policy)
« Last post by Mustak on May 25, 2018, 11:26:55 AM »

Will someone  help  me to correct  these  given  lines?

He was in his early eitgeeen ,a caged bird a renoun neuro secitist with his fascinating blinked visinsory eyes he has never seen what he is going  to seen in the coming  life, his hands  were  shivering  when  he pulled  off the sits  belt with his flited  mind.
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English / Re: English
« Last post by Mustak on May 25, 2018, 11:23:34 AM »
Will  you please  help  me to recast  or correct  these  lines?


He was in his early eitgeeen ,a caged bird a renoun neuro secitist with his fascinating blinked visinsory eyes he has never seen what he is going  to seen in the coming  life, his hands  were  shivering  when  he pulled  off the sits  belt with his flited  mind.
Will  you please  help  me to recast  or correct  these  lines?


He was in his early eitgeeen ,a caged bird a renoun neuro secitist with his fascinating blinked visinsory eyes he has never seen what he is going  to seen in the coming  life, his hands  were  shivering  when  he pulled  off the sits  belt with his flited  mind.
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English / English
« Last post by Mustak on May 25, 2018, 11:07:53 AM »
Will  you please  help  me to recast  or correct  these  lines?


He was in his early eitgeeen ,a caged bird a renoun neuro secitist with his fascinating blinked visinsory eyes he has never seen what he is going  to seen in the coming  life, his hands  were  shivering  when  he pulled  off the sits  belt with his flited  mind.
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Icelandic language Classify nouns to groups to subject
What is “Classifying nouns to groups to subject”?
I don’t understand it
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English / Re: Kindly check the grammaticality of the following sentences.
« Last post by Mustak on May 25, 2018, 04:23:20 AM »
 Hello  good  evening  Daniel  sir, I am so happy  that you have established  this wonderful  forum  where  you with have answer  from  intellectual  people.
Here is my question  for you sir  given  below

Why did I have got at me? Is this a correct  line  according  to the UK English.
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English / Re: The robin bird
« Last post by Daniel on May 23, 2018, 09:05:33 AM »
When people go somewhere new, they still use their familiar words for things that seem familiar.

A peacock in Spanish (as in Latin, etc.) was once called "pavo", but once Spanish speakers reached the new world and discovered turkeys they started calling them the same thing. So after that they started to refer to a peacock as a "pavo real", a 'royal turkey'. Or calling potatoes "earth apples" in French (and some other languages). The other option is borrowing, or making up a new word.

There are many examples like that. Even where there is no common distinction made later (like adding an adjective to one). In terms of human experience, "robins" in both places are basically the same. But it does cause some confusion for a biologist or bird watcher.

For a comparison, imagine traveling to an alien world with life biologically unrelated to any on Earth. You still probably would use some Earth-life words like "tree" or "plant" or "bird" or "fish" or "animal" or "worm", etc., if your observations were of things that felt familiar. It's also possible that in some cases the comparison is deliberate, by people who feel homesick and want to imagine their new environment as similar to the old. (Or just unaware enough to assume or even proclaim that it is the same.)
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English / The robin bird
« Last post by giselberga on May 23, 2018, 01:25:38 AM »
Spices of The European and American robin are different
Spices of The European robin is Erithacus rubecula
But Spices of The American robin is Turdus migratorius
Why do Erithacus rubecula and Turdus migratorius use “robin bird” word
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Morphosyntax / Re: Ambiguity
« Last post by Daniel on May 22, 2018, 11:21:12 PM »
Yes, that makes the alternative reading easier. But having looked at this too long my judgments are now too fuzzy to give you any specifics about likelihood or 'equal naturalness'.

My guess is that by omitting 'the' it just makes the phrase shorter, thereby decreasing the reading span between the beginning and the position of the scope element, so the garden path effect is less obvious. A similar effect would apply for example with "a group of two...", not just definite phrases.
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