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Psycholinguistics / Re: Research on grammatical gender
« Last post by Daniel on August 06, 2020, 02:31:21 PM »
That's referential, not grammatical, and only applies to animates. Sure, you can insist on that, in the same way that English has case-marking on pronouns, but no other nouns. Regardless, it is essentially irrelevant for any study of grammatical gender.
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Psycholinguistics / Re: Research on grammatical gender
« Last post by Rock100 on August 06, 2020, 09:12:23 AM »
> Yes. There's no grammatical gender in English.
This is a ballerina. SHE drinks vodka. This is HER bottle. And this is a stewardess. SHE attends this flight. This is HER bomb. These are the examples of how the grammatical gender affects the nearby words and sentences and this is what the grammatical gender does by definition. This is probably the exactly one display of the grammatical gender in Modern English but it does exist. If you have a sect of the English Grammatical Gender Witnesses on the forum, please, enlist me there.
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Psycholinguistics / Re: Research on grammatical gender
« Last post by Daniel on August 05, 2020, 02:15:12 PM »
Yes. There's no grammatical gender in English.
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Psycholinguistics / Re: Research on grammatical gender
« Last post by Rock100 on August 05, 2020, 01:41:59 PM »
> Those words differ by natural gender (mother, father, etc.), but are
> not examples of grammatical gender (e.g. as shown via agreement)
> like in many other (European and other) languages. There is no grammar
> to test in English with those words, just lexical choices.
Hm… So, it shall be possible to say “he is such a bitch” in English, shall not it?
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Psycholinguistics / Re: Research on grammatical gender
« Last post by Daniel on August 05, 2020, 12:55:59 PM »
Those words differ by natural gender (mother, father, etc.), but are not examples of grammatical gender (e.g. as shown via agreement) like in many other (European and other) languages. There is no grammar to test in English with those words, just lexical choices.
(The closest we get to grammatical gender would be the pronouns 'he' vs. 'she' and how they might need to match other words in a sentence, like 'his' or 'himself'.)
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Psycholinguistics / Re: Research on grammatical gender
« Last post by Rock100 on August 05, 2020, 08:12:18 AM »
> I question the decision to include English. English has no grammatical gender
Hm… Some foreigners still use vixen/dog-fox and lioness/lion instead of parent 1 and parent 2. There are also mama (by the way there is exactly one language in the world in which mama is male and means father), papa, uncle and aunt. Some foreign schools also still teach the ship is she.
And, for example, the vixen sounds very male for me even that I know the meaning. The ess is the adopted suffix as it is so there are no problems with it.
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Psycholinguistics / Re: Research on grammatical gender
« Last post by Daniel on August 04, 2020, 10:02:39 PM »
(I agree with the above, unless the bilingual methodology is meant to use English as a control to see lack of possible grammatical priming, but I'm not sure how the study will be set up, as in my question above, so I don't know whether that is relevant, or if English is probably not a good choice, as panini argued convincingly.)
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Psycholinguistics / Re: Research on grammatical gender
« Last post by panini on August 04, 2020, 09:53:40 PM »
I question the decision to include English. English has no grammatical gender, and given the high improbability of absolute ignorance of English amongst your subjects plus the fact that this is not an obscure detail of English requiring subtle judgments, I don't see what you could possibly learn from including English in the stimuli: instead, you'll get a bunch of "WTF dude, everybody knows English doesn't have grammatical gender!" reactions. You would be better off with French. Plus, if you really mean that you are using exactly two speakers, this is pretty much not a possible study if you're looking at the influence of native language on gender assignments. You should be less concerned with obscurata of grammatical gender and more concerned with simple experimental design.
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Psycholinguistics / Re: Research on grammatical gender
« Last post by Daniel on August 03, 2020, 04:28:02 PM »
There has been a lot written about bilingualism and a lot about gender, as well as some (but less) about the interaction of the two. You'd need to provide more details about how you're approaching this: what do you expect the effects to be, and how will you measure them? I'm not sure I have specific recommendations for you, but so far this sounds like a big topic, rather than narrow enough to build a specialized bibliography for a literature review. I can't remember exactly where at the moment, but I'm pretty sure I've seen some studies comparing gender usage in different languages by bilinguals, as well as specifically, I think, studies on the challenges this poses during acquisition. It's vague to me how you plan to measure the cross-linguistic effects: is this a priming study? Are you looking for errors?
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Psycholinguistics / Re: Research on grammatical gender
« Last post by Rock100 on August 03, 2020, 01:14:53 PM »
> I would need some scientific literature, i.e. other case studies, scientific
> papers which have handled the same or at least similar research questions.
>
> Does anyone have any suggestions on scientific literature on grammatical gender?
I would recommend addressing the corresponding Russian and German linguistic forums to conduct your queries and ask for the materials you need by addressing the philological/pedagogic institutes and philological departments of the universities – there is a big chance your interests require the materials that are mainly represented as some deposit manuscripts.
And at least the Russian forums are usually much more vivid and eager to help than for example this very one. You even may try nonspecialized Russian forums and you will still get zillions of responses (not all of them will be polite and about a grammatical gender though).

> Any help would be greatly appreciated!
I am not a linguist but I believe your point of research is extremely complex and relatively unexplored. But I probably can be a little help with some pitfalls you may encounter while querying real people.
1. I believe you shall be sure that your respondents do not know the language the words of which they are given to determine the grammatical gender. For example, for me the couch ([kushEtka]) is female and the coach ([trEner]) is male. But for a Russian who has leant these words as the divan and the horse-drawn carriage they may be vice versa.
2. Some foreign words my sound like native Russian or German words and their grammatical gender will be affected by this fact. For example, Bledina (www.bledina.com) is definitely female.
3. The grammatical gender of some words may be affected by whom you ask. For example, the endearment [zAHYkah] is male for a Russian woman and female for a Russian man. (Though the modern reality may add some variations, a Samuel Johnson could not have thought about.)

It will be nice if you share the results of your investigations here.
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