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Postings / The CALA 2020, The Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology 2020
« Last post by cala on May 22, 2019, 08:40:45 PM »
Following the successful CALA 2019, we announce

The CALA 2020, The Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology 2020

Purpose and Structure - Over 500 scholars globally will gather to present papers and to engage in progressive discussion on the Linguistic Anthropology, and Language and Society, and related fields, pertinent to Asia. The CALA is fully Non-Profit, and all publishing with the JALA (its scholarly journal) is free, refusing to implement a pay to publish system. The CALA sources funding/grants to assist people who need funding to access the Conference. The Conference proceedings will be indexed with SCOPUS and will hence contribute to ranked and cited publications for all those accepted to present, as well as directing papers to Top Tier Journal Publication Special Issues.

Location - University Putra Malaysia, Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia

Date - February 5-8, 2020

Theme - Asian Text, Global Context, a theme currently very pertinent to Asian regions and countries vis-a-vis their global analogues.

Keynote and Plenary Speakers - Eight globally prominent in Linguistics and Anthropology, including
  • Professor Li Wei (University College London)
  • Professor Susan Needham (California State University)
  • Professor Hans Henrich Hock (University of Illinois)
  • Professor Asmah Haji Omar (University of Malaya)

Official Partners
  • Taylor and Francis Global Publishers (Official Partners)
  • SOAS, University of London
  • Nanyang Technological University
  • Over 100 academic institutions globally (University of Hawai'i, Temple University, University of Illinois University, Montclair State University, Ohio State University,Hong Kong Polytechnic University,Indian Institute of Anthropologists, and so forth).
  • Scientific Committee of 120 academics globally prominent in Linguistic Anthropology and related fields

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS CLOSING DATE – August 23, 2019

Publications - Several Special (Top-Tier/Scopus/ISI/ACHI/SSCI) Journal issues and monographs are planned with well ranked publishers only, from papers submitted to the CALA 2020, that meet the requirements of review. Ample assistance is provided to revise papers.

Abstract Submissions - The Call for Abstracts is now open, at the following link, with all information: www. cala2020. upm. edu. my

Anthropological Excursion - Sarawak, Malaysia (final day) - Several options
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Morphosyntax / Re: All this time I've been thinking / kept thinking / thought...
« Last post by Daniel on May 21, 2019, 01:42:38 PM »
Either the first or last:
Quote
Oh, All this time  I’ve been thinking you work Monday-Friday. / Oh, All this time I thought you worked Friday-Monday.
The middle version:
Quote
Oh, All this time I just kept thinking you worked Friday-Monday.
is unusual, and seems to strongly suggest that "A" made a continued, careless error, especially with the emphatic "just". Something along the lines of "I'm incapable of learning your schedule because I don't pay attention!" It's possible to say this, and maybe in a joking tone, but it is not a default.

Any of the three are possible, depending on intent.
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Morphosyntax / All this time I've been thinking / kept thinking / thought...
« Last post by Natalia on May 21, 2019, 01:37:43 PM »
Could you tell me please which reaction would be best (in terms of grammar) in the following context?
A: Do you have any plans for Saturday evening? Maybe we can go out for a drink?
B: I can’t make it on Saturday I’m afraid. I work Friday-Monday.
A: Oh, All this time  I’ve been thinking you work Monday-Friday. / Oh, All this time I just kept thinking you worked Friday-Monday. / Oh, All this time I thought you worked Friday-Monday.
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Morphosyntax / Re: Present Continuous vs Present Perfect Continuous
« Last post by Natalia on May 21, 2019, 01:27:49 PM »
Thank you very much for your detailed explanation. You've been a great help.
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Semantics and Pragmatics / Re: Sense of self implicit in language
« Last post by Daniel on May 20, 2019, 11:54:01 PM »
Your equivalence is false. Your hand "is you", but only in the sense that it is a part of you. Dreams and so forth would fall into the same category. What I said about alienable and inalienable possession might interest you. (Whether dreams are coded as "alienable" because they are 'temporary' or as "inalienable" because only you can have your own dreams, I don't know, and it might vary across languages.)
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Semantics and Pragmatics / Re: Sense of self implicit in language
« Last post by Bunbury on May 20, 2019, 03:43:34 PM »
Regarding the "I am my dreams" comment, I have come to understand that I can't experience anything that "isn't me."  This is true even within the context of the materialist theory of the senses, in which case everything I experience is supposed to be something happening in my brain.  If I am my material body, and if everything I experience "happens in my brain," and if there is no aspect of anything I experience that doesn't happen "in my brain," then, even within the context of the materialist worldview there is nothing I experience (brain happenings) that "isn't me" (my material body). I have come to understand that the materialist worldview has problems, and I don't "believe" it any more - but you don't want me to get into that here!  Thanks for your response.
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Morphosyntax / Re: Present Continuous vs Present Perfect Continuous
« Last post by Daniel on May 20, 2019, 11:21:56 AM »
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OK, that makes sense now. However, I'd be very grateful if you could clarify the following so that I'm sure I fully understand it. Namely, I don't think I understand what you meant by "even though the present".
I meant that it might continue now and into the future.
I was referring to variation in how the progressive might occur: for example, the sentence:
We were eating all day yesterday.
could mean two different things (or a mix):
1. We ate continuously, without stopping at all.
2. We ate repeatedly, so that in general yesterday we spent the day eating, but with some breaks, maybe moving from one restaurant to another, and while waiting to be served food, etc.
The "ongoing" nature of the progressive allows that ambiguity, and I was suggesting maybe the mix of progressive and perfective was meant to highlight that the "continuous" sense of ongoing was not right at the moment, but that the activity would again resume in the "repetitive" sense. But again, there isn't necessarily any strict logic going on here.

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And If you don't mind. I’d like to ask you one more question about the PPC tense. If I said sth like that: I’ve been studying a lot recently, it would mean that I started studying in the past and I’m still studying at the moment of speaking, or I finished studying in the recent past. Is that right? That's what I can conclude from the definition.
That sentence is perfective, therefore only making direct statements about what has occurred up to now. Compare a simple past sentence:
I studied yesterday.
It simply does not specify whether I also study today, or whether I will tomorrow. Context could clarify.
So for "I’ve been studying a lot recently" the default assumption would probably be that the action continues to go on into the present and future, unless there is some indication of change of behavior. But that same form would also be used in a context like "I've been eating a lot of unhealthy food lately, but I'm now on a diet to eat more healthy food". So, it can go either way. It doesn't explicitly say anything about anything other than past activity, and context determines the rest. Because it's an ongoing pattern, it probably continues unless otherwise specified.

There should be an implicature here that because you're choosing to refer to it in the perfective maybe it has stopped now (due to the principle of conversational relevance and probably the maxim of quantity), but as I mentioned above, that expectation doesn't seem to work out, because this usage has become conventionalized, probably because we often use narration to tell about what we've been doing recently in small talk and similar situations. It's a little awkward to try to rephrase as "I'm studying a lot these days" (although sometimes you'll hear something like that). There is probably also a conflict with the progressive as the default in English for true in-the-moment present tense ("I'm studying"), as opposed to the simple present which is really habitual ("I study"). Using the form "I've been studying" clarifies that I'm not asserting that I am currently studying-- of course not, because instead I'm having a conversation with you.
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Morphosyntax / Re: Present Continuous vs Present Perfect Continuous
« Last post by Natalia on May 20, 2019, 02:42:25 AM »
OK, that makes sense now. However, I'd be very grateful if you could clarify the following so that I'm sure I fully understand it. Namely, I don't think I understand what you meant by "even though the present".
Quote
and it is ongoing (even though the present, probably), but in bursts, so those times are more "important" than the present moment

And If you don't mind. I’d like to ask you one more question about the PPC tense. If I said sth like that: I’ve been studying a lot recently, it would mean that I started studying in the past and I’m still studying at the moment of speaking, or I finished studying in the recent past. Is that right? That's what I can conclude from the definition.
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Morphosyntax / Re: Present Continuous vs Present Perfect Continuous
« Last post by Daniel on May 20, 2019, 12:31:21 AM »
Quote
But in the book where I found the sentence "I've been reading your book - it's great", it's clearly written that the activity is still continuing up until now, that is, "I started reading your book in the past and I'm still reading it".
The progressive (ongoing) and perfective (completed) aspects are in a bit of conflict there, although it can be rephrased coherently as "I have experienced a state of reading your book". It doesn't explicitly say anything about the present moment, but there is an implicature that it is still ongoing as relevant to the conversation and because of the progressive form. As I said, it's probably a bit exceptional and formulaic for this sort of smalltalk. I agree with what you've said, but people do say that sort of thing.

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I think there must some kind of connection between the past and present here? If I simply said, "I'm reading a really good book now", to me it would mean "that's what I'm doing at present, and the focus is on the ongoing acitvity", but if I used the present perfect continuous, what would I exactly express? Would I emphasise the continuity and duration of the action?
Language isn't always logical, so there isn't always an easy explanation. Here, it might just be an exception. Or, if you do want a "story" to explain it, then maybe something like this: "I'm reading your book" would emphasize the present moment as well as similar activity at other times, but "I've been reading your book" emphasizes the past experience in contrast to the fact that you are not literally reading the book right now, and it is ongoing (even though the present, probably), but in bursts, so those times are more "important" than the present moment. Something like that, probably.
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Morphosyntax / Re: Predicative inversion
« Last post by Daniel on May 20, 2019, 12:27:25 AM »
"From newspapers"-- you could search a corpus of newspapers. Or you could just read newspapers to find them. I'd have to do the same thing to find examples for you.
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