Author Topic: reading a spectrogram in praat-french word  (Read 6258 times)

Offline Daniel

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Re: reading a spectrogram in praat-french word
« Reply #15 on: January 31, 2014, 11:37:59 AM »
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So, thinking you can hear a 'p' and not actually hearing a 'p' don't have to be contradictory statements. A 'p' might not be there, but its traces might be, which are often very highly associated with such a sound.
Exactly. Stops are mostly recognized by the effects they have on surrounding vowels.
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Offline katie333

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Re: reading a spectrogram in praat-french word
« Reply #16 on: February 01, 2014, 08:31:58 AM »
hmmm...in the ipa transcription of symptome in french there is no "m"
the nasale E~ is followed by a p.  Is it still possible the speaker is making an m sound?
also, I cannot see a break between the p and t at all.  how do you show this on a spectrogram you are picking apart?

Offline Daniel

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Re: reading a spectrogram in praat-french word
« Reply #17 on: February 01, 2014, 08:38:06 AM »
Ideas like "m sound" make little sense acoustically. Consider instead the timing of gestures. In answer to the question: kinda.
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Offline katie333

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Re: reading a spectrogram in praat-french word
« Reply #18 on: February 01, 2014, 09:06:11 AM »
I'm wondering if phonetics is my thing.  I am trying!

Offline Daniel

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Re: reading a spectrogram in praat-french word
« Reply #19 on: February 01, 2014, 09:26:55 AM »
That's ok. This isn't intuitive at first!
Remember that sounds are not distinct units except in the meaning contribution (contrastiveness). Instead you hear/see the effects of movement in the articulators. Looking for landmarks/changes rather than segments will help.
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