Author Topic: Nonsense language patterns - Korean, Japanese, Chinese  (Read 5077 times)

Offline szegedin

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Nonsense language patterns - Korean, Japanese, Chinese
« on: May 31, 2014, 07:48:01 PM »
[right thread?]
Hi all - question from a filmmaker for linguists: can anyone point me to nonsense language patterns in Korean, Japanese, or Chinese languages.

By that I mean a structured way of producing nonsense speech akin to the French 'verlan' English 'pig latin' or better yet Serbo-Croatian Šatrovački. The latter is (I believe incorrectly) listed in Wikipedia as being akin to pig latin whereby syllables are reversed. However the Šatrovački I know involves substituting every vowel for one of the same, as in:
Brate, neću da igram fudbal. (Bro, I don't want to play football.)
Briti, nići di igrim fidbil

If there is any such patterned, childish or slangish way of making nonsense speech in the above languages, I would be interested to know, as I don't know the technical term for this kind of thing.

thanks

Offline MalFet

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Re: Nonsense language patterns - Korean, Japanese, Chinese
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2014, 12:23:44 AM »
Phonologists are usually pretty interested in this stuff, though I've never seen it called anything more specific than "language games". I don't have any particular knowledge about Korean, Japanese, or Chinese, but there's a wikipedia page listing a few basic mechanics for each. It's a bit thin on details, but the names might help you get started. Let us know what you find!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Language_game

Offline Daniel

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Re: Nonsense language patterns - Korean, Japanese, Chinese
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2014, 10:28:52 AM »
There are also the terms "argot" and "secret language" that are a bit more functional-- meant to obscure meaning from outsiders. Sometimes these involve similar game-like properties. You can find information if you search for those terms.
One famous example is Cockney Rhyming Slang.
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Offline ibarrere

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Re: Nonsense language patterns - Korean, Japanese, Chinese
« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2014, 06:08:22 AM »
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However the Šatrovački I know involves substituting every vowel for one of the same, as in:
Brate, neću da igram fudbal. (Bro, I don't want to play football.)
Briti, nići di igrim fidbil

The Šatrovački I'm familiar with is the Wikipedia-type wherein syllables are switched around, resulting in the common Belgrade slang for marijuana being vutra instead of trava. The reason for the vowel switch is to avoid overlap with the existing word vatra meaning fire.
http://americanwerewolfinbelgrade.com/

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