Author Topic: Linking: syllabic "l" to "l" consonant  (Read 1138 times)

Offline zoltankr

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Linking: syllabic "l" to "l" consonant
« on: October 06, 2015, 10:54:49 PM »
Hi, I read in a book that when the final consonant of one word is the same as the first consonant of the following word, we pronounce the consonant only once and do not pause between the words. For example:

Black cat. [blæk‿kæt]  k pronounced only once
Good day. [gʊd‿deɪ]
What time. [wʌt‿taɪm]

My question is: does this rule apply when a word ends in a syllabic "l" as well? For example:

Little lower. [lɪt l loʊ ər]

In other words, as a native speaker do you try to pronounce both "l" sounds in "little lower" or you link them together as one "l" sound?

Any suggestion is appreciated. Thank you!

Offline Daniel

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Re: Linking: syllabic "l" to "l" consonant
« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2015, 01:23:28 AM »
Depends on speech rate. But that sounds fine to me. It would be strange, in a regular conversation, to make an emphatic pause between the two words (except for clarification) so there would be some blending there.
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Offline panini

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Re: Linking: syllabic "l" to "l" consonant
« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2015, 09:32:59 AM »
What book made such a claim? That seems really odd and contrary to experience. Saying that we pronounce the consonant only once and don't pause is, shall we say, an uninformed way of talking about it. We don't pause, period. Is this supposed to refer to a propensity to not release stops before homorganic consonants (not just "the same")? Since [l] is not a stop, there's no released / unreleased distinction, so there is a false presupposition in the question.

Offline Daniel

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Re: Linking: syllabic "l" to "l" consonant
« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2015, 04:19:17 PM »
My guess is that it is a general suggestion for learners to speak more fluidly and with elision between words rather than a strict rule. It's not "wrong" to pronounce them twice but also not required.
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