Linguist Forum

Specializations => Phonetics and Phonology => Topic started by: giselberga on May 18, 2018, 08:33:09 AM

Title: Is this words Sandhi?
Post by: giselberga on May 18, 2018, 08:33:09 AM
Is this words Sandhi?

Example
1.France
Je + amie = j’aime
L’amore
L’Italie

2.English
I + am = i’m
You + are = you’re
Will + not = won’t
Title: Re: Is this words Sandhi?
Post by: Daniel on May 18, 2018, 08:49:34 AM
No.

"Sandhi... is a cover term for a wide variety of sound changes that occur at morpheme or word boundaries."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandhi

Those are just contractions. More technically, they're part of a (diachronic) cliticization process where originally independent words become attached to others as dependent morphemes, like affixes, but still somewhere between morphology and syntax.

A few of those have some kinds of sound changes ("won't" for example) that you could call "sandhi" but mostly that would be missing the overall point.
Title: Re: Is this words Sandhi?
Post by: panini on May 18, 2018, 09:24:15 AM
I, however, partially disagree: contractions can be a sub-type of sandhi. The matter at issue would appear to be the extent to which the phonological operations have to be "general" as opposed to having contextual restrictions. I would actually claim that the English examples are directly inflectional, in the sense that you can select between "I am" or "I'm", "will not" or "won't", and "won't" is not synchronically derived from /will+not/. French, however, would be sandhi, i.e. actual vowel deletion.
Title: Re: Is this words Sandhi?
Post by: Daniel on May 18, 2018, 09:35:00 AM
I suppose. But the term for the phenomenon indicated in those examples overall is not "sandhi" but "contraction" (or "cliticization"). That is, the phenomenon that those examples best illustrate.