Author Topic: A question:Comparison some consonants in English  (Read 399 times)

Offline nguyen dung

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A question:Comparison some consonants in English
« on: August 01, 2017, 08:41:00 PM »
Is the tongue in pronouncing n wider than in pronouncing t?Is the tongue in pronouncing n more relax than in pronouncing t?Is the tongue in pronouncing light l  rather tense and narrow and is the body of tongue slightly having a form of cylinder or having a flat form?Does the blades of tongue curve up or down or not curve up and down if the tongue is rather flat?Is the tongue in pronouncing th more relax than in pronouncing t?
« Last Edit: August 01, 2017, 10:09:23 PM by nguyen dung »

Offline Daniel

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Re: A question:Comparison some consonants in English
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2017, 05:49:48 AM »
This link I gave you to answer the other question should help with this too:
http://soundsofspeech.uiowa.edu/english/english.html

No, N/T/D all have the same position for the tongue. The difference is voicing (vibration of the vocal folds) for D and N (but not T), and that air continues through the nose for N (a nasal sound!).

Sometimes T is pronounced differently. At the end of a word, it may be unreleased meaning there's no sound after T, just the end of the word. So you might not hear T very clearly. One example is "can" and "can't", which actually can be pronounced exactly the same way (yes, that's confusing, even for native speakers of English). Additionally, between two vowels, some English dialects have different pronunciations. One in British English is a glottal stop (just a pause, in the throat, between the vowels) like "bottle" or "water" being pronounced like "bah-ul" or "wah-er", with no T at all. For American English, the same words would be pronounced with a "flap" or "tap", which is like a very short T or D. It actually sounds more like D probably, but it's shorter than both sounds. Something like "boddle" or "wadder", but pronounced very quickly (that's why it's called a flap/tap).
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