Author Topic: Earthlings Speak Moon Language  (Read 11796 times)

Offline Lingvogeometry

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Earthlings Speak Moon Language
« on: December 21, 2014, 09:41:47 AM »
Dear colleagues, please check my new paper with important linguistic discovery. Will be glad to hear your comments and critique.
Abstract:
The argumentation of ability to create effective compression algorithm for text data with means of in-language patterns and correlations, found by Glossematics theory. Demonstration of successful implementation of such algorithm.
Results received during the study allow to place and justify the hypothesis about formation and development of human language on basis of unified semantic constant, which is available for observation to every earthling.
Human language described as algorithmic structure based on prototype of binary logic taken by developing organisms from environment.
Unpredictable discovery that will change the world and help to understand our own history without brake of Occam’s Razor principle. 


Earthlings Speak Moon Language

Offline Daniel

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Re: Earthlings Speak Moon Language
« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2014, 01:21:23 PM »
Moon language? I don't follow. This sounds confusing. What's the main point?
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Offline Lingvogeometry

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Re: Earthlings Speak Moon Language
« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2014, 02:23:42 PM »
In short, human languages show interesting correlation, when similar phonetic structures give similar semantic characteristics.
My hypothesis is that this happens due to common mechanism of naming objects and phenomena.
Digging it deeply I understood that most semantic characteristics by some way refer to one object which is the moon.
You can check all M-N roots like Moon, mono, mini, money to understand what I mean.

Offline Daniel

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Re: Earthlings Speak Moon Language
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2014, 03:50:24 PM »
I don't see how that would be defended within any recognized linguistic theory.

The main problem is sound change:
http://etymonline.com/index.php

While in English that word does have m-n for a long time, it goes back to only m- in Proto-Indo-European and many of the words listed for other languages have completely different sounds. In the future of English I would not be surprised if it changes to something else.

In the end, you're finding coincidences. Or maybe you are finding a very very small effect. Basically you can say "sometimes [something] correlates with the m-n sequence", and that's true. But it doesn't predict anything-- if we look at a new language you can't predict that the word will have those sounds. Consider Spanish 'luna', not looking too far away. Or in Arabic 'qamar'. In Japanese there's no overlap: 'tsuki'.

In the end, I don't see the reason to spend more time on this topic. If you'd like me to, then answer this question: why? What is gained by doing this? Can you predict something? If so, make some predictions (without looking at the data) then we can check if you're right. If not, it's not science.
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Offline freknu

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Re: Earthlings Speak Moon Language
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2014, 01:05:08 AM »
Ahahahaha! Writing systems go back to drawing the shapes of the moon? :D

The rest of the paper is just as lacklustre and insubstantial. It's essentially a kind of mythoetymology, which has been tried many, many times before.

While in English that word does have m-n for a long time, it goes back to only m- in Proto-Indo-European and many of the words listed for other languages have completely different sounds. In the future of English I would not be surprised if it changes to something else.

Actually, the (or one) PIE reconstruction would be *mḗh₁-n̥-s (in turn from an earlier *méh₁-n-os), however, *meh₁- ("to measure") is the actual root; n is very productive as both an infix and suffix (derivational and inflectional).
« Last Edit: December 22, 2014, 01:10:37 AM by freknu »

Offline Lingvogeometry

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Re: Earthlings Speak Moon Language
« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2014, 02:17:57 AM »
You are correct, without prediction power any theory is not science. I will try to demonstrate that my theory has such power.

Regarding etymologies, please understand that I do not change or question existing etymology. I talk about pan-linguistic phenomena. What you call coincidences in deed has strict rules. I have discovered it with means of reverse engineering and big data analysis, not just by playing with words. After linguistic correlations were found prime role of the moon was detected in existing ancient texts like Rigveda and Bible, which proves the theory well.
Why do we need it? Humanity is trying to understand how our brain works, how it stores and processes the information. This is the key. Our language is BINARY structure with two basic constants taken from environment. Looking at the moon gave to developed brain two visual constants circle and crescent. And the brain has utilized it to make communication system we all know as language.
To prove it here is my prediction.
If you’ll take from ANY existing language roots with construction MB/NB/MP inside and check its meaning and etymology, in most cases you will receive limited set of semantic characteristics: mouth, stone, child (young), water, boat, fish, horns, unite, death, crescent shape.
Start with niMBus – crescent shape object related to dead people in fish- and cow-oriented religion. And having water in etymology as it means “cloud, mist”

Offline freknu

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Re: Earthlings Speak Moon Language
« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2014, 03:28:30 AM »
If you’ll take from ANY existing language roots with construction MB/NB/MP inside and check its meaning and etymology, in most cases you will receive limited set of semantic characteristics: mouth, stone, child (young), water, boat, fish, horns, unite, death, crescent shape.

That's not limited at all. With such a broad list you could fit almost any word into that category — which not surprisingly always seems to be the case with "theories" such as these.

Offline Daniel

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Re: Earthlings Speak Moon Language
« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2014, 11:08:38 AM »
Quote
What you call coincidences in deed has strict rules. I have discovered it with means of reverse engineering and big data analysis,
That's exactly the problem. As freknu says, your semantic range is not "strict" at all. And big data analysis has major statistical problems: by including more data, it's more likely that you'll find coincidental matches.

Here's some math for you if you'd like:
http://www.zompist.com/chance.htm
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Offline freknu

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Re: Earthlings Speak Moon Language
« Reply #8 on: December 23, 2014, 01:06:29 AM »
http://www.zompist.com/chance.htm

You've probably shared that a few times already, but, yoink! Even I can understand those equations :)

Offline Lingvogeometry

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Re: Earthlings Speak Moon Language
« Reply #9 on: December 23, 2014, 01:10:41 AM »
>>>semantic range is not "strict" at all

it is limited by unique root composition. There are not many roots with it. Just try it. Check any existing language and find a word with asigned construction. You will meet fish, horns, boat very quick.

After I have found mentioned semantic core I was surprised that it correlates with archeologic findings. This is an annotation for book of Erich Zehren - The Crescent and the Bull: A Survey of Archaeology in the Near East (1986):
During thousands of years, the moon was most important deity in many cultures – Old Egyptian, Sumerian, Babylonian, Assyrian, Chinese etc. That persuasively proves common roots of ideology and religion of different nations. Main symbols of the moon – the bull, the lamb, the fish, boat of dead are met in mythology of many countries and images across the globe. Historical ethnographic book of E. Zehren summarized works of hundreds of scientist, dedicated themselves to researches of roots of religion symbolism and mythological texts.

As you can see, archeologists came to completely same semantic core as my study. Coincidence? No! It is our forgotten history. And our language screams about it.

Offline freknu

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Re: Earthlings Speak Moon Language
« Reply #10 on: December 23, 2014, 01:57:36 AM »
it is limited by unique root composition.

Then you need to learn what a root is.

PIE. *meh₁- "to measure"
  • En. moon "moon; month"
  • Rus. mésjac "moon; month"
PIE. *(s)kand- "to shine"
  • Alb. hënë "moon"
  • Grk. seléne "moon"
  • Skr. cãd "moon", candrá "shining; moon"
PIE. *lewk- "to shine"
  • Arm. lusin "moon"
    Lat. lūna "moon"
PIE. *sp(ʰ)eng- "to shine"
  • Grk. phéngos "moonlight", fengári "moon; moonlight"
PIE. *gʰel- "to shine"
  • Iri. gealach "moon; moonlight"
PIE. *denĝʰ- "to shine"
  • Isl. tungl "moon"
PIE. *aisk- "bright; shining"
  • Iri. éasca "moon"
PSTib. *s-(g)la- "moon; month"
  • Bur. la "moon; month"
  • Man. xi1 "moon; month"
  • Can. zik6 "moon; month"
  • Tib. zka ba "moon; month"
PU. *kuŋe "moon; month"
  • Fin. kuu "moon; month"
  • Hun. hold "moon; acre"
PS. *warḫ- "moon; month"
  • Akk. warḫu "moon; month"
  • Uga. yrḫ "moon; month"
  • Ara. yarħā’ "moon; month"
PTur. *ay "moon; month"
  • Tur. ay "moon; month"
PMPol. *sinaʀ "moon; month"
  • Haw. mahina "moon; month"
PAus. *bulaN "moon; month"
  • Ind. bulan "moon; month"

Notice anything? Most roots seem to be limited to two very specific meanings:

(1) to measure
(2) to shine

Offline Lingvogeometry

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Re: Earthlings Speak Moon Language
« Reply #11 on: December 23, 2014, 05:42:00 AM »
Thanks for such nice excurse! Believe me I know all that etymologies as my 5 fingers )
Please give your explanation, why the moon is connected to measuring.

Offline freknu

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Re: Earthlings Speak Moon Language
« Reply #12 on: December 23, 2014, 06:54:10 AM »
Please give your explanation, why the moon is connected to measuring.

Because that's what the etymology tells me... o_O

Not "mouth, stone, child (young), water, boat, fish, horns, unite, death" or "crescent shape".

Offline Lingvogeometry

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Re: Earthlings Speak Moon Language
« Reply #13 on: December 23, 2014, 07:46:27 AM »
>>>Because that's what the etymology tells me... o_O

Yes, but what is your opinion as a linguist, why the moon is connected with measuring?

>>>Not "mouth, stone, child (young), water, boat, fish, horns, unite, death" or "crescent shape".

You did not make offered way. To make it more easy, just remind M-N words in English (moon, man, mono etc). You will meet mentioned semantic characteristics very quick.

Offline freknu

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Re: Earthlings Speak Moon Language
« Reply #14 on: December 23, 2014, 08:01:44 AM »
>>>Because that's what the etymology tells me... o_O

Yes, but what is your opinion as a linguist, why the moon is connected with measuring?

As a linguist, I cannot say anything; from an anthropological point of view I can speculate that it is probably because of perceptive proximity. Humans perceive time — and not taking into account small spans of time — the first proximal measure of time is the sun showing day and night, then comes the moon showing week and month, then the seasons showing year.

However, this does not prove any part of your hypothesis.

>>>Not "mouth, stone, child (young), water, boat, fish, horns, unite, death" or "crescent shape".

You did not make offered way. To make it more easy, just remind M-N words in English (moon, man, mono etc). You will meet mentioned semantic characteristics very quick.

"Moon" is from *meh₁- "to measure"; "man" is from either *mon- "human" or *men- "mind; to think"; "mono" is from *men- "small".

Just because they superficially look similar does not mean that they are related. You are cherry picking and crowbaring.