Author Topic: non-anaphoric adverb,what does that mean  (Read 8964 times)

Offline mallu

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non-anaphoric adverb,what does that mean
« on: April 04, 2014, 01:22:42 PM »
See this sentence
languages have monomorphemic non-anaphoric adverbs expressing the time, location,and manner relationships, but they do not have such adverbs expressing purpose, reason, concession, etc.
 
Could someone tell me what non-anaphoric adverbs? Thanx in advance

Offline freknu

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Re: non-anaphoric adverb,what does that mean
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2014, 03:18:05 PM »
anaphora = Using a pronoun or similar word instead of repeating a word used earlier
non-anaphora = the inverse of that

Exactly what that means I'm not quite sure, I guess adverbs that are never "referenced", as in replaced with pronouns, but always repeated.

So perhaps instead of:

Yesterday I went to the store and then to the library.

; you would say:

Yesterday I went to the store and yesterday to the library.

Offline Daniel

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Re: non-anaphoric adverb,what does that mean
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2014, 03:37:30 PM »
I think this refers to words like "always" or "outside", as opposed to "in some way" or "despite what happened"
(The first two are monomorphemic, even though they come from historically multimorphemic phrases.)

An anaphoric adverb would be something like "then" as freknu pointed out.
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