Author Topic: Problem with the compound classification  (Read 440 times)

Offline Natalia

  • Linguist
  • ***
  • Posts: 96
Problem with the compound classification
« on: July 05, 2017, 09:44:24 AM »
I would like to ask you for advice concerning the compound "reader-listener-viewer". It's surely a coordinate compound, as it refers to one entity. However, I'm not sure how to treat this compound in terms of its structure. My friend told me that she would classify it as syntehtic, but, the syntehtic compounds I have analysed so far usually consist of two elements (e.g. "bus driver") and there is some semantic relationship between the two elements. That is why, "reader-listener-viewer' is neither root nor synthetic, in my opinion. Could you please give me your opinion on that?

Offline Daniel

  • Administrator
  • Experienced Linguist
  • *****
  • Posts: 1533
  • Country: us
    • English
Re: Problem with the compound classification
« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2017, 10:01:50 AM »
Isn't it the same as "writer-director", "singer-songwriter"? These are sometimes called appositional compounds I think.
Welcome to Linguist Forum! If you have any questions, please ask.

Offline Natalia

  • Linguist
  • ***
  • Posts: 96
Re: Problem with the compound classification
« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2017, 10:30:36 AM »
Yes, it's exactly the same. Could appositional compounds (like "writer-director") be at the same time synthetic?

Offline Daniel

  • Administrator
  • Experienced Linguist
  • *****
  • Posts: 1533
  • Country: us
    • English
Re: Problem with the compound classification
« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2017, 11:04:34 AM »
In what sense? Apposition involves renaming, rather than a modification or argument relationship.
Welcome to Linguist Forum! If you have any questions, please ask.

Offline Natalia

  • Linguist
  • ***
  • Posts: 96
Re: Problem with the compound classification
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2017, 11:25:14 AM »
That's what I thought. Let me ask you just one more question about synthetic compounds. Is it always the case that synthetic compounding involves argument relationship?
For example, I classified  the compound "environmental management" as syntehtic because it contains the verbal head and the first element acts as an argument of the head (managing the environment). Is that right?

Offline Daniel

  • Administrator
  • Experienced Linguist
  • *****
  • Posts: 1533
  • Country: us
    • English
Re: Problem with the compound classification
« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2017, 01:24:35 PM »
Environmental management is an adjective modifying a noun.
Environment management is a noun-noun compound. And yes, it is basically the same meaning (managing the environment).

As for the definition, that's a question of the definition-- which are you using? I imagine that would make sense, but since these are just descriptive terms, it's not an empirical question (you can't answer it with data, only by citing a definition).
Welcome to Linguist Forum! If you have any questions, please ask.

Offline Natalia

  • Linguist
  • ***
  • Posts: 96
Re: Problem with the compound classification
« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2017, 02:47:54 PM »
"Environemtnal management" seems to be a lexicalised expression. It's defined in online dicitionaries, there are 534 occurrences in COCA. Why cannot it be a compound? The linguist R.Lieber, for example, cited "arctic cat" as an example of a compound.

Offline Daniel

  • Administrator
  • Experienced Linguist
  • *****
  • Posts: 1533
  • Country: us
    • English
Re: Problem with the compound classification
« Reply #7 on: July 05, 2017, 03:27:34 PM »
I understand the term "compound" to refer to a noun+noun combination, or other combination with an unusual/non-syntactic modifier (like verb+noun).

I guess there's no reason why an adjective and noun couldn't form a compound, except that I would see that usage as a normal adjective+noun noun phrase, rather than a compound.

As for "arctic cat", the word "arctic" is ambiguous, either a noun or an adjective. I assume the meaning is intended to be "cat of the arctic" when it is claimed as a compound.
Welcome to Linguist Forum! If you have any questions, please ask.