Author Topic: Nouns as modifiers  (Read 3706 times)

Offline Jase

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Nouns as modifiers
« on: March 31, 2014, 07:25:56 PM »
When a noun is used to modify another noun, how is it represented in X-bar Theory? It’s funny that Carnie has not yet explained this (or I missed it), and yet he gave us several exercises with it in the GPS sections of chapter 7.

For example, see number GPS5(b): Linguistics students like phonetics tutorials. If linguistics and phonetics were adjectives, we would go [NP [N'...[AdjP...[N...]]], but that isn’t the case.

I’ve attached a tree image with my question more specifically worded. Thanks!
Just getting into syntax. Appreciate any help I can find here.
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Offline Jase

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Re: Nouns as modifiers
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2014, 07:27:55 PM »
I accidentally used D' instead of D in the image. Please, ignore that.
Just getting into syntax. Appreciate any help I can find here.
χάριν ἔχω ὑμῖν πᾶσιν τοῖς βοηθοῦσί μοι φίλοις.

Offline Daniel

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Re: Nouns as modifiers
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2014, 09:50:02 PM »
This is a good essay I've seen assigned in classes that use his book ;)

Either analysis is possible-- you could say that it's possible to modify a noun with a noun (and add the appropriate PSRs), or you could say that in those instances the N becomes an A and use the normal AP rule.

The distinction, which you can work out yourself if you'd like, depends on distributional criteria.

Consider, for example:
*The very water fountain.
The very large fountain.
*The linguistics student is better than the physics one.
The nice student is better than the mean one.
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