Author Topic: Movement of Adj.P to D.P specifier  (Read 1725 times)

Offline binumal

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Movement of Adj.P to D.P specifier
« on: March 26, 2014, 10:27:30 AM »
In many languages (including my mother tongue) an adj in a D.P can be placed  either between a D and N(oun P) or before the D.For example,the equivalent of the phrase "that blue ball" can be "blue that ball" that too.
My question is how can this be explained within the generative framework?,is the adjective  placed initially moved to the specifier of the D.P or it is an adjunct?
Hope someone will come out to help me clear this doubt.
Am I not clear enough?,then please tell me
« Last Edit: March 26, 2014, 12:44:55 PM by binumal »

Offline Daniel

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Re: Movement of Adj.P to D.P specifier
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2014, 01:11:05 PM »
Are you certain that the "D" is actually not just an adjective? There's no reason that a word with the semantics of "that" must also share the same syntax as English.

You're referring to a Dravidian language, right? I don't know of (but correct me if I'm wrong) any articles like "the", although I think the numeral "one" is starting to be used sort of like "a" in English in Malayalam. So if there are no real determiners, then this could explain what is happening.
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Offline binumal

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Re: Movement of Adj.P to D.P specifier
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2014, 01:21:03 PM »
Yes . I am telling about Dravidian Languages. and you are right that there is no "the" in Dravidian languages. So you think it is not the movement that causes this type of  word order difference

Offline Daniel

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Re: Movement of Adj.P to D.P specifier
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2014, 02:38:45 PM »
Quote
So you think it is not the movement that causes this type of  word order difference
That's possible. But the simpler assumption is that there is no "word order difference" because all of the words are the same class (adjectives). If that is an insufficient explanation, you might want to reconsider the movement analysis.
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