Author Topic: Takineko's Japanese Lessons  (Read 4467 times)

Offline waive15

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Takineko's Japanese Lessons
« on: September 27, 2020, 10:18:37 AM »

Offline waive15

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Re: Takineko's Japanese Lessons
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2020, 08:32:48 AM »
Hi,

Here is the book

Eiichi Kiyooka - Japanese in Thirty Hours [1953, PDF, ENG]


https://gofile.io/d/00GyGD

/the link will not last long so one can get the book from rutracker org
/just register and in the search box enter Eiichi Kiyooka

===

Lesson 10

Here is a man.

"...
The Japanese language makes distinction between living things and inanimate things. For men, animals and general living things i-masu is used while for things which do not move - including trees and plants - ari-masu is used. ..."

---

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/imek

imek = i + mek (inf. suffix)

but

olmak = ol + mak

-mek/-mak  (if the vowel before it is soft or hard)

===

If one goes to References of (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/imek) and

1. presses on “*er-"
then
2. presses on "+" after

Altaic etymology: Altaic etymology +

/it is the 2nd line, below
Proto-Turkic: *er-/

one gets

Japanese: *àr-

            E - A
       /*er- - *ar-/

===


Have a nice day.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2020, 09:06:04 AM by waive15 »

Offline waive15

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Re: Takineko's Japanese Lessons
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2020, 02:10:50 AM »
Hi,

"...
Japanese Writing and Pronunciation

In writing, a Japanese employs Chinese characters and kana together. A Chinese character has its individual meaning as well as the sounds, and it is employed for nouns, verbs, adjectives and such "solid" words. A kana represents merely a syllable sound and it has no meaning of its own. It is employed for endings, post-positions and such parts of less import. There are forty-eight letters in kana while there are a limitless number of Chinese characters.
...

It is not impossible to write everything in kana, but (1.) that will betray the lack of education on the part of the writer. Indeed, the original meaning of the word kana is substitute letter, and the Chinese characters are considered real letters (hon-ji). (2.) Although the Chinese characters are difficult to learn, once they are learned and mastered, they make a most rapid reading possible, because they convey the meaning directly to the eyes without resorting to the "sound".
..."
p. 169, Japanese in Thirty Hours, Eiichi Kiyooka


Have a nice day