Author Topic: Russell: “On Denoting”  (Read 1151 times)

Offline waive15

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Russell: “On Denoting”
« on: October 29, 2021, 01:32:52 AM »

Offline waive15

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Re: Russell: “On Denoting”
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2021, 01:54:01 AM »


SEMANTICS-8: Sense, Reference & Denotation

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9c_5OW2wM4Q


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the course

SEMANTICS-1: What is Semantics?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MlRNrSajB-0

...



« Last Edit: November 04, 2021, 03:34:36 AM by waive15 »

Offline waive15

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Re: Russell: “On Denoting”
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2021, 02:58:19 AM »

Events

https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/events/


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4. From Events to Time

https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/tense-aspect/#EveTim



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Sense Data

https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/sense-data/#RussSensData


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Law of excluded middle

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_of_excluded_middle

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Bertrand Russell and Principia Mathematica

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This is not much help. But later, in a much deeper discussion ("Definition and systematic ambiguity of Truth and Falsehood" Chapter II part III, p. 41 ff), PM defines truth and falsehood in terms of a relationship between the "a" and the "b" and the "percipient". For example "This 'a' is 'b'" (e.g. "This 'object a' is 'red'") really means "'object a' is a sense-datum" and "'red' is a sense-datum", and they "stand in relation" to one another and in relation to "I". Thus what we really mean is: "I perceive that 'This object a is red'" and this is an undeniable-by-3rd-party "truth".

PM further defines a distinction between a "sense-datum" and a "sensation":

    That is, when we judge (say) "this is red", what occurs is a relation of three terms, the mind, and "this", and "red". On the other hand, when we perceive "the redness of this", there is a relation of two terms, namely the mind and the complex object "the redness of this" (pp. 43–44).

Russell reiterated his distinction between "sense-datum" and "sensation" in his book The Problems of Philosophy (1912), published at the same time as PM (1910–1913):

    Let us give the name of "sense-data" to the things that are immediately known in sensation: such things as colours, sounds, smells, hardnesses, roughnesses, and so on. We shall give the name "sensation" to the experience of being immediately aware of these things... The colour itself is a sense-datum, not a sensation. (p. 12)

Russell further described his reasoning behind his definitions of "truth" and "falsehood" in the same book (Chapter XII, Truth and Falsehood).

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« Last Edit: November 04, 2021, 04:37:42 AM by waive15 »

Offline waive15

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Re: Russell: “On Denoting”
« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2021, 02:02:25 AM »

Daryl Zero: A few words here about following people. People know they're being followed when they turn around and see someone following them. They can't tell they're being followed if you get there first.

Daryl Zero: Passion is the enemy of precision. Forget the misnomer 'crime of passion'. All crime is passionate. It's passion that moves the criminal to act, to disrupt the static inertia of morality. The client's passion for this dead woman had facilitated his downfall. And the blackmailer's passion will facilitate hers. When you live with no passion at all, other people's passion come into glaring relief.

Daryl Zero: I can't possibly overstate the importance of good research. Everyone goes through life dropping crumbs. If you can recognize the crumbs, you can trace a path all the way back from your death certificate to the dinner and a movie that resulted in you in the first place. But research is an art, not a science, because anyone who knows what they're doing can find the crumbs, the wheres, whats, and whos. The art is in the whys: the ability to read between the crumbs, not to mix metaphors. For every event, there is a cause and effect. For every crime, a motive. And for every motive, a passion. The art of research is the ability to look at the details, and see the passion.