Author Topic: Linguistics on QuizUp!  (Read 2416 times)

Offline lx

  • Global Moderator
  • Linguist
  • *****
  • Posts: 164
Linguistics on QuizUp!
« on: April 15, 2014, 03:40:05 PM »
If you use the QuizUp app on your phones then make sure you look for the Linguistics section. I've been playing on it all day and I'm hooked. I don't get to spend as much time in all those random facts and quirky details related to Linguistics that I would like to keep fresh in my mind, but this has been interesting to bring it all back up into working memory again. Definitely recommend.

Online Daniel

  • Administrator
  • Experienced Linguist
  • *****
  • Posts: 1485
  • Country: us
    • English
Re: Linguistics on QuizUp!
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2014, 05:23:52 PM »
That is fun, thanks.

There is a wrong answer, though-- it claimed that "Proto-Nostratic" was the hypothetical ancestor to all human languages. That's not right... maybe that's what is standard in Russian philology, though I doubt even that. Nostratic is supposed to be about 15,000-20,000 years old and include most of Eurasia but not other parts of the world. (On the other hand, the other terms weren't specifically familiar to me, though "Proto-Terran" seemed closest.) The other answers seemed right.


Edit: Uh oh. Another error-- Tok Pisin comes from "Talk Pidgin", not "Talk Business"... where's the correction button? :D

But this is a lot of fun.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2014, 05:32:45 PM by djr33 »
Welcome to Linguist Forum! If you have any questions, please ask.

Offline lx

  • Global Moderator
  • Linguist
  • *****
  • Posts: 164
Re: Linguistics on QuizUp!
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2014, 05:39:16 PM »
That is fun, thanks.

There is a wrong answer, though-- it claimed that "Proto-Nostratic" was the hypothetical ancestor to all human languages. That's not right... maybe that's what is standard in Russian philology, though I doubt even that. Nostratic is supposed to be about 15,000-20,000 years old and include most of Eurasia but not other parts of the world. (On the other hand, the other terms weren't specifically familiar to me, though "Proto-Terran" seemed closest.) The other answers seemed right.
Well, it's a quiz app. There's always going to be things a bit off. I was playing the grammar game the other day and there's enough stuff in there to send a linguist insane that is based on misconceptions and lacking the true story. You can't judge it with the sames standard you would an academic theory or a paper. It's just a bit of fun. :) It was clear what the question was getting at, though perhaps the wording could have been better. I have been surprised with the level of clear questions though, especially determining the relationships between sub-fields of linguistics and the major players in the game.

Edit: regarding Tok Pisin - are you sure? I was told at university it came from talk business / business speech or something relating to that area. That would correlate with the same thing as Talk Business in my mind. In any case, there is a way to flag incorrect stuff and report it at the bottom at the end of a game. Clean it up so it's factually accurate :)
« Last Edit: April 15, 2014, 05:44:05 PM by lx »

Offline lx

  • Global Moderator
  • Linguist
  • *****
  • Posts: 164
Re: Linguistics on QuizUp!
« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2014, 05:45:37 PM »
Ah, it seems it's a well established theory that 'pidgin' does derive from the word 'business' pronounced by Chinese speakers. That kind of establishes the connection.
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=pidgin

Online Daniel

  • Administrator
  • Experienced Linguist
  • *****
  • Posts: 1485
  • Country: us
    • English
Re: Linguistics on QuizUp!
« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2014, 09:44:49 PM »
Interesting about the origin of pidgin. I suppose I'll accept that :)
Welcome to Linguist Forum! If you have any questions, please ask.

Offline Copernicus

  • Linguist
  • ***
  • Posts: 60
  • Country: us
    • Natural Phonology
Re: Linguistics on QuizUp!
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2015, 11:23:17 AM »
Interesting about the origin of pidgin. I suppose I'll accept that :)
But don't be too accepting of it, because Tok Pisin really does appear to mean "pidgin talk", not "business talk".  The etymology is correct, but the answer in the quiz is actually based on an etymological fallacy