Author Topic: Your favorite (international) food  (Read 1642 times)

Offline Daniel

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Your favorite (international) food
« on: December 23, 2013, 05:26:44 AM »
This isn't quite about language, but just for fun:

What's your favorite type of food, of all the cuisines in the world?

And is there any connection to languages you speak or study?


I would add a poll, but I wouldn't know which options to include.


---
For me, I'd have to say Chinese food, or really any East Asian stir fry dishes. (Ok, I admit it, I'm used to the Americanized versions, but I've tried it in other countries and still liked it, though never in Asia... haven't been there yet.)

As for a linguistic connection, none really. I did study Japanese for 6 months, so I can sometimes read several words on a sushi menu, but that's about the extent of it. I'd like to study Chinese at some point, when I have some time to learn the characters. There's a fantastic book by Jim McCawley (known otherwise for his work in Linguistics!) about learning the Chinese characters specifically for the purpose of eating and getting access to dishes that usually aren't included on translated menus:
The Eater's Guide to Chinese Characters

I'm usually very picky about American food, but for new 'foreign' food I'm often more adventurous. I've tried a bit traveling around.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2013, 05:30:35 AM by djr33 »
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Offline Corybobory

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Re: Your favorite (international) food
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2013, 05:56:43 AM »
Yummm!  Sometimes I think my reason for living and being is for eating food ;)

I've studied Japanese for quite some time and really enjoy cooking Japanese - my speciality in my household (and when I get to cook, since my husband is the cook), is okonomiyaki - a kind of Japanese cabbage pancake with meat.  Delicious!  We also like having Japanese curry, or gyoza and ramen noodles.

Although if I had to pick one type of food to eat until I die, I'd pick Tex-Mex.  My Spanish is somewhat pitiful, but I'll happily eat burritos all day every day and never complain.  Burritos burritos burritos. 

Unfortuantely Mexican food isn't very popular in the UK, and there's not many restaurants or ingredients in the shops unless you go to specialty stores (finding a nice salsa even is nigh on impossible)!  Mission Burrito is a pretty good burrito restaurant though :)

I'm not sure why I like Tex-Mex food so much, Canada's not too big on it either.  You just can't beat an amazing burrito.
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Offline Guijarro

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Re: Your favorite (international) food
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2014, 12:30:03 PM »
In my case, I adore the French patisserie.

I think one must go to Paris, first and foremost, to be able to try the chausson aux pommes they bake in some special places (not all chaussons aux pommes are edible, mind!). But I love any other kind of patisserie (and boulangerie!).

The croissants au beurre are also some kind of treat which is difficult to describe. This, however, is very easy to find in all French cities and villages. It amazes me that such a popular patisserie which is delicious all over France (and also in ex-French territories, like Senegal, where I have eaten some of the best of my life) cannot be found in any city in Spain. What they call cruasanes here is some kind of horror that makes you sick only by smelling it.

And yes, you must speak French to go into a Boulangérie-Patisserie and ask almost absent-mindedly for your preferred food. Here is a tip:

YOU: 'Ssieux' dames!
PATISSIER: 'Jour, ssieu/madame. Vous désirez?
YOU: Un croissant au beurre, un pain au chocolat, un chausson aux pommes, svp.
PAT: Voilà.
YOU: Merci mssieur/madame. Bonne journée!
PAT: Merci. Bonne journée à vous aussi


In some popular restaurants (called brasseries, which means really bear shops) you may also end your meal with a wonderful tarte tatin (with crème fraiche, don't forget that!).

I have developped some appetite right now. So long, I'm going to have dinner!