Author Topic: Truespeak - Update (fifth level of syllable sophistication and exclamations)  (Read 149 times)

Offline Aldebaran

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I've lately made a post on this site about a langauge I've created, this post is just a follow-up. Read the previous one if you want some background: http://linguistforum.com/linguist's-lounge/so-i've-created-a-very-functional-language-with-only-32-words/

Here is the next level of sophistication, the fifth, of Truespeak pronunciation.

XXXX0 - The consonant at the beginning is pronounced with the lips stretched. It's a subtle difference, but a noticable one.

XXXX1 - The opening consonant is pronounced with the lips puckered.

XXX0X - The opening consonant is "soft", meaning that no air is pushed out with the sound (it's a little difficult to explain how this works with IPA or any equivalent of which I know).

XXX1X - The opening consonant is "heavy", meaning that as the sound comes out, so does a gust of air.

The best way I can explain this is that the "force" given to the consonant is from the inside mouth in XXX0X's case, and with the lungs in XXX1X's case.

XX0XX - Similar to XXXX0, only with the finishing consonant.

XX1XX - Similar to XXXX1, only with the finishing consonant.

X0XXX - (Lack of X1XXX's effect, see below.)

X1XXX - The finishing consonant has a z before it if it is voiced, and an s if not (think "ak" vs "ask").

0XXXX - (Lack of 1XXXX's effect, see below.)

1XXXX - If the first particle in the syllable is a 0XXXX particle, then the opening consonant becomes the fricative equivalent of what would normally be a 1XXXX particle (t becomes ths, th becomes thsh; m, r, h, and rh are special cases that become st, zd, sht and zhd respectively). If the first particle in the syllable is a 1XXXX particle, then the opening consonant gains the fricative equivalent of what would normally be a 1XXXX particle (ts becomes tths, ksh becomes kkhsh; s, z, sh, and zh are special cases that become sk, zg, shk and zhg respectively).

Another thing worth mentioning is the fact that when speaking, one can "start" the syllable from the vowel to imply that the syllable is an exclamation. An example would be "egh", which could be interpreted as "Well!", or "What joy!" rather than "happiness/love" ("edh" can be "Hello!"; "o" can resemble a question mark in many situations; "av" can mean "Oh, alright then." [understanding]; "awv" can be "Excuse me?/I don't understand."; et cetera, et cetera).
« Last Edit: November 22, 2017, 05:33:36 AM by Aldebaran »

Offline Aldebaran

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Because it's fun, I'm going to list a whole load of Truespeak exclamations, simply because I can.

wiiylsh - Over here!
iiwnmd - No, I don't want to interact with you.
e'uun - Hello (very informal and even slightly insulting, like "'sup?").
(o)e(o)z - Hello (more formal, up-beat and joyful).
am - Hello (another interesting variation, which could be interpreted as "peace to [you]").
'Raym - Hello (the more formal version of "am", "peace to you").
'Riyldh - F*** you (pretentious and condescending).
il'dhiil - F*** you (just plain old rude).
il'iin'iil - F*** you (worse than the two above, and very lowly to say (it makes you look dumb, too)).
ildh'kiil - F*** you (a more personal and hurtful thing to say).
ii'dhiil - You're great!
'Riiydh - You're great (more formal)!
iidh'kiil - You're great (say this variation to make someone's day)!
ii - Awesome (don't use this in any situation other than very informal ones)!
iik - Wonderful (more formal than the one above, yet still unacceptable at workplace-level places)!
iind - Hey, everyone (used to get attention from a crowd)!
'nm - Yes (just one way out of many).
iwk - Yes (somewhat like saying "not no", and rather formal).
i - No (most informal way, rather rude and lowly for nearly all situations).
it - No (just a bit more formal than "i", you'd use this with your friends and with non-authoritative family members).
iwt - No (the generally accepted form of "no", and formal enough for parents and strangers, yet not people you're trying to impress).

As a general rule of thumb, you wouldn't use exclamations around more formal environments, since they are always one level less sophisticated than the actual highest level of sophistication within them (an exclamation containing three levels is already using forth-level phonetics).
« Last Edit: November 22, 2017, 06:02:14 AM by Aldebaran »