Author Topic: Funny quiz for native English speakers  (Read 2155 times)

Offline waive15

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Re: Funny quiz for native English speakers
« Reply #15 on: January 24, 2020, 01:45:53 AM »
Hi Rock100,

So we have these initial conditions: two languages(dialects), words in those languages(dialects), a man which goes from  one(1st) language(dialect) into another(2nd) language(dialect).

Words from the 1st and the 2nd                           Meaning

same words                                                        same meaning

same words                                                        different meaning

different words                                                   same meaning

different words                                                    different meaning



Your post reminded me of Metathesis.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metathesis_(linguistics)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavic_liquid_metathesis_and_pleophony



If you want/like look at them in English and Russian. Metathesis reminded me how much I don't like languages.

Thank you for you post/Funny quiz.../. It was interesting for me.

Have a nice day.

Offline Rock100

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Re: Funny quiz for native English speakers
« Reply #16 on: January 24, 2020, 01:14:00 PM »
Well, the articles are not my level completely – I have a technical background and some observations look very strange to me and the others – I just do not know some even Russian sample words and need to Google them; a kind of fun. And, by the way, regarding the quote “Proto-Slavic medvědь "bear" (literally 'honey eater') > Russian медве́дь ('medvéd' ')”. In Russian the “honey eater” is literally honeyeater (medoed) and it is not a bear but the honey badger (Mellivora capensis). Russian bear медве́дь ('medvéd' ') means “knows where the honey is” – med (honey) ved[aht’] (to know, old-fashioned). So, the Internet things may be really misleading indeed.
Thanks for the directions. Some of that staff we really had at school but on the simpler level.

Offline waive15

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Re: Funny quiz for native English speakers
« Reply #17 on: January 24, 2020, 05:47:21 PM »
Thank you Rock100,

Now I got it: med (honey) ved[aht’] (to know, old-fashioned)!    razVEDka, VEDomost', ...

You are right "the Internet things may be really misleading indeed."

Thank you and have a nice day.

Offline Rock100

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Re: Funny quiz for native English speakers
« Reply #18 on: January 24, 2020, 08:49:32 PM »
> You are right "the Internet things may be really misleading indeed."
Yes, I am, and this may apply to my answer too. The explanation I have given above is exactly the one I had leant at school. And that one might be wrong because it could be not a medVED’ but medvED’. And ED is the one who eats indeed (or probably just the food -- eda). But I do not know what to attach ‘v’ to. As far as the word is very old, its etymology may include a “medv” indeed. In addition to classes at school I talked about etymology of medved’ exactly one time in my life and I even remember the person (not a professional too). And the conclusion was med-ved’ too, not a medv-ed’. Moreover in a Slavic language, probably, Ukrainian one, it is vedmed’ which is looks very like as “knows about honey (med)” or “in charge of honey” and, please, notice the 'v's position. But as far as the wiki insist on eating (ED and not VED) this logical and very neat explanation may appear to be wrong. At least I began to doubt about it and got up to turn back the computer to write this additional elaboration, a kind of to save my reputation.
So, if you are probably professionally interested it would be better to double check this very case. Personally I incline to med-ved’ or ved-med’ even if it is not 100% correct.