Author Topic: What do you think conservative language?  (Read 540 times)

Offline giselberga

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What do you think conservative language?
« on: April 21, 2018, 04:08:10 AM »
What do you think conservative language?
Mandarin, Cantonese, Icelandic, Spanish is conservative language
How do you think conservative language?

Offline panini

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Re: What do you think conservative language?
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2018, 09:22:55 AM »
I don;t think there is any such thing as a conservative language, but perhaps if you explain what you mean by "conservative language", I might change my mind. I also don't know what you mean by "what do I think (of)": like, do I like Cantonese (I have no opinion), or why do I think Cantonese is a conservative language (I don't because I don't know what "conservative language" means). Perhaps if you explain what you're asking...

Offline giselberga

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Re: What do you think conservative language?
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2018, 10:17:45 AM »
Conservative language in linguistics means to remain closer to an older form. This do not change language
For example, Mandarin, Cantonese, Icelandic, Spanish is conservative language
How do you think conservative language?

Offline panini

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Re: What do you think conservative language?
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2018, 02:55:53 PM »
I guess you're asking, why do some languages seem to change less or more slowly, compared to others. The standard story is that there must be some unknown sociological factors, but I think that's a bit facile. It is certainly true that if you have two linguistically different populations smashing into each other, you are likely to have substantial changes in language resulting. E.g. Moroccan Arabic is much further from Classical Arabic because originally Moroccans spoke Berber; Saudi dialects of Arabic tend to be the most conservative, correlated with the fact that Arabic was originally spoken only there. I don't think, though, that this really explains why Norwegian is so different from Old Norse, and Icelandic isn't.

The one social fact that does seem to have a connection to language change is urbanization. Seoul Korean has changed more from Middle Korean, compared to other especially rural dialects, and in general, linguists have found that cities are leaders of language change. Perhaps this is because cities attract speakers from many dialect areas, and what emerges is a mashing together and sanding-down of dialect differences.