Author Topic: Sources to learn latin vocabulary from proto-indo-european-roots  (Read 1144 times)

Offline Manfred

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Hello everyone,

I want to learn latin vocabulary systematically on the basis of proto-indo-european roots.
The source/book should list pie roots and latin words derived from them, including words derived by addition of further affixes.

Can anyone recommend something?

Thanks for help,
Manfred

Offline Daniel

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Re: Sources to learn latin vocabulary from proto-indo-european-roots
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2017, 03:11:59 PM »
That won't be a very efficient way to learn Latin, but certainly this can be a relevant way to study historical linguistics.

Pokorny's etymological dictionary of PIE roots, originally written in German (e.g.  and https://archive.org/details/indogermanisches02pokouoft), is available in English translation here: https://archive.org/details/Indogermanisches-Etymologisches-Woerterbuch -- or https://indo-european.info/pokorny-etymological-dictionary/index.htm or https://marciorenato.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/pokorny-julius-proto-indo-european-etymological-dictionary.pdf (Note that the 'Indo-European Revival Association' isn't a historical linguistics group per se but an effort to actually revise, and therefore in some ways extend/amend Proto-Indo-European for modern usage, but their version of Pokorny's dictionary is probably not changed much.)
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Offline Joustos

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Re: Sources to learn latin vocabulary from proto-indo-european-roots
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2018, 04:19:09 PM »
Hello everyone,
I want to learn latin vocabulary systematically on the basis of proto-indo-european roots.
The source/book should list pie roots and latin words derived from them, including words derived by addition of further affixes.
.....
Manfred
You already have some wise answers, yet you or your readers should realize that it would take many years for you to say in Latin, " Then the wolf said to the lamb: since you mud my water, I have to eat you up." Or you can reconstruct Aesop's fable, which was retold in Latin as "Lupus et Agnus". To go from these two words to the proposed sentence: Deinde agno lupus dixit...., you must learn how to specify who is speaking to whom by studying some available grammar. The Indo-European roots will not tell you how "loqui latine" [to speak Latin]. Good luck.